Parsley, please

May 26, 2013 at 5:25 pm Leave a comment

parsleyMichael Pollan may need to slightly revise his eater’s manifesto. How about: “Eat food. Not too much. Mostly wild plants.” Or at least wilder than what you find in most super market vegetable bins.

If we want the most nutritional bang for our bucks, we should walk on the wilder side, according to  Jo Robinson, opining in The New York Times.

The author of Eating on the Wild Side says that most of today’s vegetables (like that sweet corn you’ve been day dreaming about) don’t have nearly as much nutritional power as heirloom varieties do. That means purple potatoes are better than the usual white Idahos. Those bright orange carrots I happily chomp down most days are indeed very good for me. But apparently they don’t have nearly as many nutrients as the heirloom purple ones at the Farmer’s Market and local co-op.

Turns out, the Big Food folks have managed to breed much of the nutrition out of everyday tomatoes, corn, carrots, and other mass produced produce. Eating those veggies is better than gobbling potato chips for sure, but if you want maximum nutrition, it’s time to get picky.

The good news is, this doesn’t have to be complicated, or costly. Weeds like chickweed, dandelions and nettles that propagate freely all over my yard, are packed with nutritional power. And herbs, any herbs, are also densely nutritious.

If you think parsley is just a throw-away garnish, think again. It’s easy to grow parsley or find it fresh in the market, and if you just add it to everything you eat, you’ve got maximum nutrition with little effort.

Robinson suggests the following:

  • Select corn with deep yellow kernels.
  • Cook with blue, red or purple cornmeal.
  • Choose arugula over iceberg lettuce (that’s a no brainer).
  • Scallions or green onions are more nutritional than the white or yellow kind, and wild onions are the most nutritional of all.
  • Herbs are wild plants, too even though you can cultivate them in your garden. Adding herbs like parsley and basil not only add flavor, they add nutrients.

 

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Entry filed under: Nutrition, Sustainable Food, Uncategorized, Wild Food. Tags: , , , , .

Chickweed pesto Organic poultry processor coming to Siler City

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