Posts filed under ‘Sustainable Farming’

It’s Farm Tour Time

Farm Tour logoThe nation’s largest sustainable farm tour celebrates its 20th year with an open tour of 40 farms in Orange, Chatham, Alamance and Person counties, April 25-26.  The Piedmont Farm Tour is a great outing for the whole family and a chance to learn more about where our food comes from and why it’s important to grow sustainably. Farm visitors will be able to purchase and sample a variety of fresh local food right where it is produced.

Tour stops include pasture-raised livestock farms with lots of baby animals, sheep shearing, fiber demonstrations and hayrides. There are pick-your-own strawberry patches, vineyards, a farm that grows grains and hops for the craft beer industry, an award-winning cheese dairy, flower beds, lots of gorgeous organic produce farms, and more.

“Food you can trust starts at the source – with the farmer,” says Roland McReynolds, executive director of tour co-sponsor Carolina Farm Stewardship Association. “The farm tour has shown our community how sustainable agriculture is good for consumers, good for farmers and farmworkers, and good for the land. Opening the farm gate and inviting people in is one of the best ways for farmers and consumers to get to know each other and work together.”

The tour is self-guided. Choose the farms you want to visit on the interactive map at www.carolinafarmstewards.org/pft/ to plan your tour.  Visit any farm in any order or choose from one of our Piedmont Farm Tour adventure trails.  The farms on these suggested routes are within a 15-20 minute drive of one another, which will help you maximize farm-fresh fun and minimize driving.  Don’t forget to bring a cooler so that you can bring home some of the farm fresh products for sale.  Many farms also offer lunch, snacks, and treats for sale.  No pets allowed. The tour is on rain or shine.

Tour tickets purchased in advance are $30 per car for all farms, all weekend. Day of registration is $35. Tickets can be purchased online now at www.carolinafarmstewards.org/pft/ or at Weaver Street Market at their locations in Chapel Hill, Carrboro and Hillsborough.

New farms on the tour this year include:

Down2Earth Farm: Once a dairy farm that ended operation in the 1940s, the site now has over 100 varieties of vegetables, blueberries, and shiitake mushrooms. Tour the new greenhouse and barn. www.d2efarms.com

Sweet Pea Farm: This small-scale, sustainable family farm features historic farm buildings, vintage tractors, vegetable and flower gardens, heirloom apple and pear orchard, bee hives, and nice picnic spot at the pond. sweetpeafarmnc@gmail.com

Open Door Farm: Take a scenic stroll to the pond, sample some microgreens in the greenhouse and see how these farmers are transforming a 100-year old tobacco farm into a sustainable produce and cut-flowers operation. www.opendoorfarmnc.com

Peaceful River Farm: This 18 acre farm on the ancient Haw River sustainably grows vegetables, herbs, and berries and offers healthy cooking classes and farm dinners in the beautiful Education Barn. www.peacefulriverfarm.com   

Complete information about the tour and the farms, with interactive maps and tour tickets: www.carolinafarmstewards.org/pft/

The tour is co-sponsored by the Carolina Farm Stewardship Association (CFSA) and Weaver Street Market, and proceeds support the work of CFSA.

 

 

 

 

April 10, 2015 at 9:52 am Leave a comment

Women rock our foodshed

Andrea Reusing

Andrea Reusing

North Carolina ‘s widely recognized real-food scene is cultivated by hundreds of innovative chefs, farmers, advocates and entrepreneurs.  A recent story in The New York Times noted that so many are women. Got that right.

Women are running the best professional kitchens across the state, reported Kim Severson. But there’s more. “The food sisterhood stretches out beyond restaurants too, into pig farming, flour milling and pickling,” she wrote. “Women manage the state’s pre-eminent  pasture-raised meat and organic produce distribution businesses, and preside over its farmers’ markets. They influence food policy and lead the state’s academic food studies. And each fall, the state hosts the nation’s only retreat for women in the meat business.”

Turns out women lead in “every single link in the food chain in North Carolina,” said Margaret Gifford, who spent 16 years in the state and founded the nonprofit Farmer Foodshare (now directed by Gini Bell).

The Times feature cited amazing chefs including Andrea Reusing (Lantern), Ashley Christensen (Poole’s Downtown Diner and more), Katie Button (Asheville’s Curate and Nightbell), and Vivian Howard (Kinston’s Chef and the Farmer, and the PBS Show A Chef’s Life).

Other leaders include  food studies professor Marcie Cohen Ferris (UNC), innovative pickler April McGreger (Farmer’s Daughter), baker Phoebe Lawless (Scratch), pork producer Eliza MacLean (Cane Creek Farm), meat distributor Jennifer Curtis (Firsthand Foods) and millers Jennifer Lapidus and Kim Thompson (Carolina Ground).

In our Pittsboro foodshed alone, we admire Debbie Roos, our sustainable agricultural extension agent and pollinator garden propagator. Also Slow Money NC co-founder Carol Hewitt, Abundance NC director Tami Schwerin, sustainable ag community college director Robin Kohanowich, Greek restaurateur Angelina Koulizakis-Bashista and a long list of female farmers, co-op leaders, food bank operators, and farmers’ market managers. Yow.

Men working in the food shed told The Times that it’s not surprising that women are leading the way. “For me, it’s as simple as the cream rises to the top,” said Chef Tandy Wilson (City House).

To read the full story: http://www.nytimes.com/2015/01/28/dining/a-food-sisterhood-flourishes-in-north-carolina.html?ref=dining&_r=0

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

January 28, 2015 at 6:20 pm Leave a comment

Fertilizing a food desert

interfaith-food-shuttle-Hoke StAn urban farm and community garden has sprouted at 500 Hoke Street in southeast Raleigh. Though it’s only two miles from the capital’s trendy eateries, the Inter-Faith Food Shuttle farm is at the heart of a “food desert.”

Most of its neighbors can’t afford to dine upscale downtown. And there’s no supermarkets nearby where they can find healthy groceries for their families. Urban food deserts typically rely on fast-food joints and convenience stores, where calories are cheap but not necessarily nutritious. That’s a recipe for the growing incidence of obesity, Type 2 diabetes and other costly ailments related to poor diets.

Hoke Street turned out to be an ideal location for the urban farm and training center for Inter-Faith Food Shuttle, the anti-hunger nonprofit serving Raleigh and seven surrounding counties for the last 25 years. The new three-acre site now includes community garden beds for residents wishing to grow their own produce, and an urban farm and training center for interns learning to cultivate and sell healthy food.

Katie_Murray_IFS_Farm

Katie Murray

“We set up this space so people could see how food is grown, and grow it themselves” said Katie Murray, who coordinates IFFS urban agriculture training programs. We visited during the Carolina Farm Stewardship Association’s annual farm tour.

Half a dozen families are growing vegetables in the new IFFS community garden. And there’s an open raised bed for curious neighbors who want to taste what’s sprouting — red leaf lettuce when we visited. IFFS also has cultivated a partnership with Will Allen, the now-famous MacArthur Foundation “Genius” Fellow behind Growing Power, the organization teaching young people around the country about innovative sustainable practices for urban farming enterprises. IFFS has four interns through the program, working at the Raleigh farm and learning about composting, vermiculture, aquaponics, hoop houses, mushrooms, micro-greens and more.

“The goal is to grow food here and sell it through local farmers’ markets and to restaurants,” Murray said. The interns are gaining experience to develop their own small enterprises through a collaborative local alliance.

The farm is adjacent to a 14,000 square-foot warehouse, where IFFS stores local food gleaned from farms and delivers it to neighborhoods through its mobile market program. The IFFS warehouse also serves as a community grocery store during a monthly market on fourth Fridays.

Inter-Faith Food Shuttle also has a Teaching Farm on Tryon Road, with incubator plots for those ready to start their own farming enterprises.

http://www.foodshuttle.org

 

October 15, 2014 at 3:46 pm 4 comments

Organic poultry processor coming to Siler City

chickenLocal chicken farmers have faced hard times since Townsend, Inc. filed for bankruptcy four years ago and closed its poultry processing plant in Siler City, NC. But now a Moore County start-up may have good news, especially for growers able to fulfill contracts to raise organic, non GMO poultry.

Carolina Premium Foods plans to invest $4 million to renovate the former Townsend plant in Siler City, re-opening a new organic processing facility in about five months. They  hope to process up to 200,000 birds per week there, providing about 150 jobs in the first phase and more than 350 jobs in the next phase, according to company spokesperson Sonya Holmes. The company has received a $750k grant from the North Carolina Rural Infrastructure Authority to develop the plant. The new 95,000 square-foot facility could be the first organic poultry processor of this type — focusing on smaller, non-GMO, organic birds — in the state of North Carolina.

Farmers interested in new organic contracts may contact Holmes at 910-984-5309.

 

 

 

August 26, 2014 at 10:37 am Leave a comment

Save our farms from fiscal cliff

farmbillUS Senate Majority Leader Harry Reid (D-NV) proposed a fiscal package last week that would correct the devastating cuts made to local food and organic agriculture in the “fiscal cliff” deal passed by Congress last month.

The proposal would end direct payments for subsidies and restore the programs for renewable energy, rural small businesses, value-added agriculture, new and beginning farmers, conservation, specialty crops, organic farming, minority farmers, and local food producers that were left out of the farm bill extension portion of the fiscal cliff deal. The cost of those programs combined paled in comparison to the $5 billion price attached to the direct payment program. The Reid proposal would right that wrong and it would also provide immediate funding for livestock disaster assistance, which was also left out when the farm bill was thrown over the cliff earlier.

The Reid proposal would cut defense spending and net farm bill spending by $27.5 billion each over the next decade. The proposal saves the federal government $31 billion in direct commodity production subsidies, while reinvesting $3.5 million to pay for a full farm bill extension, including the programs not included in the fiscal cliff extension.

One of the programs not included in the fiscal cliff farm bill extension provided cost share funds to growers to become certified organic. That program distributed almost $60,000 to NC growers in 2012. Another program not included in the extension provided funding for an organic grain-breeding program at NC State University. This program provided badly needed support to the growing NC organic grain industry through research on organic crop production and pest management.

“We applaud Sen. Reid for taking this step to restore federal support for local food and organic agriculture,” said Roland McReynolds, executive director of the Carolina Farm Stewardship Association. “These small, targeted investments help small and medium-scale farms and businesses provide jobs and healthy food for their communities.”

February 19, 2013 at 10:06 pm Leave a comment

Buying local is only the first step

Check out this TEDx talk by Stacy Mitchell, senior researcher with the Institute for Local Self-Reliance. She says buying local is a great idea, but it’s only the first step in changing the world.  We know that small sustainable farms produce more than twice as much food per acre as big farms, with far less environmental impact.  But Walmart continues to capture one in four food dollars in America — and  half the market in some three dozen metro areas — not because its food is better (clearly, it’s not), but because it can use its giant market power to influence politics, and the business and tax policies affecting food. It will take collective action by citizens demanding new policies — including a wholly new Farm Bill — to reform our economy for the better. That’s an audacious goal, one worth working toward, while we continue to build a sustainable foodshed for our community.

Here are some excerpts from Stacy’s talk:

“The primary and often exclusive way we think about our agency in the world now is as consumers. But as consumers we’re very weak. We’re operating as lone individuals, making a series of small decisions, and the most we can do is pick between the options that are presented to us….we’re hoping that someday enough of us will have enough information about all the issues and all the choices in the marketplace, and we’ll have access to all the right alternatives, and all or most of us will be able to make the right decisions all or most of the time. But while we’re trying to line up all of these millions of small decisions in the right direction, we are swimming upstream against a powerful down current of public policies that are taking our economy in exactly the opposite direction.

“What we really need to do is change the underlying structures that create the choices in the first place….by acting collectively as citizens…

“We could begin by turning the farm bill on its head. Instead of giving the most money to the biggest farmers feeding the fast-food pipeline, why not give the most money to local farms, feeding their neighbors?…

“The answers are there, and the public support is largely there. The question we have to grapple with is, how do we begin to see our trips to the farmers’ market and to the local bookstore not as the answer, but as the first step? How do we transform this remarkable consumer trend into something more? How do we make it a political movement?”

February 17, 2013 at 4:44 pm 1 comment

Eat, drink, fund the foodshed

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UPDATE: Supper tickets to this are sold out, but you can still attend, drink some brew and make a $10 donation to support the cause.

Friends, this is a no brainer. I love eating seasonal food raised on local farms. Especially when it’s served in a local eatery. I’ve been  dying for a quench of that new Cackalacky Ginger Pale Ale at FullSteam in Durham. And who wouldn’t want to chip in to support new community-based funds for newbie local farms and food enterprises, through  great local orgs like Slow Money NC, the Abundance Foundation and Carolina Farm Stewardship Association?

Looks like I’ll get to do all of this and more by plunking down $15 at FullSteam Brewery, Jan. 27 at 7 pm.  A little extra for the brew. What a deal, all part of a new dinner series called Funds to Farms.  And you can join in the fun. Here’s how it works.

The first Funds to Farms event will be a buffet style, sit-down meal featuring soup (veggie & meat) donated by Vin Rouge Bistro. Attendees will have the first half hour to get their food and drinks and make it to a table.Bon appetit.

Then, five local beginning farmers and food entrepreneurs will each pitch a project for which they need our funding, i.e. the dough-re-mi we gave at the door, and some of the brew proceeds, too.  After all of the presentations, attendees (that’s us) will vote on which project we would like to fund. The winner gets the proceeds from the evening and promises to attend the next Funds to Farms event to give a progress report.

Tickets are available online and at FullSteam on the day of the event.

www.fundstofarms.com

January 9, 2013 at 10:11 pm 2 comments

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